UNTITLED/WHITECAT

likeafieldmouse:

Walter de Maria

architectureofdoom:

Trees growing from the ruins of weapons from battlefields

installator:

"An art handler with Tomma Abts’s Zebe, 2010.” “The installation period is the most exciting and intense part of organising an exhibition.” (Tate)

"An art handler"….
This photo is from an online article written by Curator Melissa Blanchflower about the install process of an exhibition. There is nothing particularly unusual about how this article is written and it speaks very positively about the hard work involved in making exhibitions. It simply follows the widespread practice of describing art handlers/preparators/registrars/etc as nameless and invisible workers. This woman is a skilled professional. The individuals who took her photo and wrote this article should know her name. She is most likely a full time employee of the Tate Britain and has worked in this field for many years. Why are her contributions anonymous, even when a photo of her is used to promote this exhibition? This may seem like a very minor thing but it really gets to us because this is so symptomatic of how a whole industry of talented and passionate people are treated. There is an understanding that installing art is not glamorous and is not a way to seek fame, but instances like this seem as though the creators of the article had to go out of their way not to acknowledge her. The author of the article is named, multiple curators of the exhibition are named, all of the artists are named and the photographer is credited on all photos. Why don’t art handlers have names?

installator:

"An art handler with Tomma Abts’s Zebe, 2010.” “The installation period is the most exciting and intense part of organising an exhibition.” (Tate)

"An art handler"…. This photo is from an online article written by Curator Melissa Blanchflower about the install process of an exhibition. There is nothing particularly unusual about how this article is written and it speaks very positively about the hard work involved in making exhibitions. It simply follows the widespread practice of describing art handlers/preparators/registrars/etc as nameless and invisible workers. This woman is a skilled professional. The individuals who took her photo and wrote this article should know her name. She is most likely a full time employee of the Tate Britain and has worked in this field for many years. Why are her contributions anonymous, even when a photo of her is used to promote this exhibition? This may seem like a very minor thing but it really gets to us because this is so symptomatic of how a whole industry of talented and passionate people are treated. There is an understanding that installing art is not glamorous and is not a way to seek fame, but instances like this seem as though the creators of the article had to go out of their way not to acknowledge her. The author of the article is named, multiple curators of the exhibition are named, all of the artists are named and the photographer is credited on all photos. Why don’t art handlers have names?

biggestpaintingshowever:

Kiki Smith
Pyramid design before the addition of the Eye of Providence,”Deo Favente” (With God’s Favor) and Palm tree.

Pyramid design before the addition of the Eye of Providence,”Deo Favente” (With God’s Favor) and Palm tree.

currency note designed by Benjamin Franklin, 1776
Preliminary design for the back of the 1935 dollar bill, the first to include the Great Seal of the United States, with Franklin Roosevelt’s note of approval and request for two changes. This initial version had the obverse of the seal on the left and the reverse on the right, but Roosevelt ordered them switched, and added the phrase “The Great Seal of the United States” underneath.
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/29/arts/music/pete-seeger-songwriter-and-champion-of-folk-music-dies-at-94.html

(Source: photolan, via catzrule)

appendixjournal:

By making the original subject of these drawings—the human intervention—vanish, Justin Berry creates a new illustration, which focuses on the landscape itself. We see a scene that appears to be the aftermath of a battle or the site of some natural catastrophe. A new artwork on The Appendix.

appendixjournal:

By making the original subject of these drawings—the human intervention—vanish, Justin Berry creates a new illustration, which focuses on the landscape itself. We see a scene that appears to be the aftermath of a battle or the site of some natural catastrophe. A new artwork on The Appendix.

(via mulchthief)

Phil Elverum - Get Off The Internet

redflagflying:

“I am opposing a social order in which it is possible for one man who does absolutely nothing that is useful to amass a fortune of hundreds of millions of dollars, while millions of men and women who work all the days of their lives secure barely enough for a wretched existence.” ― Eugene V. Debs

redflagflying:

“I am opposing a social order in which it is possible for one man who does absolutely nothing that is useful to amass a fortune of hundreds of millions of dollars, while millions of men and women who work all the days of their lives secure barely enough for a wretched existence.”Eugene V. Debs

(via historyisaweapon)